New Horizon API explorer posted (new queries!)

While watching the VMworld US 2019 video of Sean Massey presenting about getting started with the Horizon API’s I decided to check if the API explorer has been updated. To my surprise it was and it is good to see that several queries have been added besides the method’s that I previously found.

The new queries that I found are:

  • DesktopAssignmentView
    • Description:
      • Desktop id + Desktop assignment data which will include desktop pool information, operation system, global entitlement.
  • DesktopHealthInfo
    • Description:
      • Desktop health Information. This data will be populated only for the desktops which support application remoting.
  • GlobalEntitlementSummaryView
    • Description:
      • Summary information about Global Entitlements.
  • MachineSummaryView
    • Description:
      • This View includes summary data of all entities related to this Machine

So the DesktopAssignmentView seems to give a lot of similar data to what the DesktopSummaryData query already gives. They both give global entitlement data plus user assignment data. The big difference is that it gives way more detailed information about the desktop pool itself like vGPU settings. The names should have been DesktopInfo in my opinion.

Desktophealthinfo is created for the new Windows 10 App remoting and the monitoring for that. The globalentitlementsummaryview and machinesummaryview are linked to GlobalEntitlementInfo and MachineDetailsView from which they give a subset of data.

I hope to have a new blog post soon with more detailed information of what the new method’s and queries will bring but I wanted to update you with the fact that the api explorer has been updated as soon as possible.

Updates to the Horizon API’s in PowerCLI 11.4

So today PowerCLI 11.4 was released with the following updates:

  • Add support for Horizon View 7.9
  • Added new cmdlets to the Storage module
  • Updated Storage module cmdlets
  • Updated HCX module cmdlets

As usual we need to wait for API explorer to be updated before we get the exact changes to the api’s but I already grabbed s short list by comparing the methods. Later I will create a more elaborate blog post about the changes if I have an overview. What I do see are some new additions that might be added to the vCheck for Horizon.

Also: even though the updates are for Horizon 7.9 there’s a good chance that a lot of this also works for previous versions, the examples below where done with 7.8.

  • Datacenter
  • DesktopHealth
  • Gateway
  • GatewayHealth
  • MessageClient
  • Monitoring
  • PersistentDiskQueryService
  • Privilege
  • SecondaryCredentials
  • SessionStatistics
  • StorageAccelerator
  • UsageStatistics
  • Validator
  • VirtualCenterStatistics

Sadly it’s late so I can only show a couple of examples:

$services.Privilege.Privilege_ListSelectablePrivileges()

 

$services.SessionStatistics.SessionStatistics_GetLocalSessionStatistics()

Finally we can reset the usage counters as well now

And some statistics from vCenter

($services.VirtualCenterStatistics.VirtualCenterStatistics_listSummaryStatistics())
($services.VirtualCenterStatistics.VirtualCenterStatistics_listSummaryStatistics()).DataStoreSummaryStatistics

[API]How to successfully logoff users in Horizon

One of the things that annoy me about the Horizon admin interface is the fact that if you give a session the logoff command that this only works if the user is active aka when the desktop is not locked. With the api’s though (and Andrew implemented this in the helpdesk fling) it is possible to force a logoff. Let’s look at the available method’s first.

So we have a logoff and logoffForced. But there are also the logoffsessions and LofoffSessionsForced, I guess those let you logoff multiple sessions. this is what the extensiondata says about them.

So for the singular method’s we need a single id and for the sessions we need an array of ids. At first I will use get-hvglobalsession (yes, this works against sessions in other pod’s in a cloud pod architecture as well!) to get the id’s to show how it works. I have 5 sessions running from my desktop

$services1.Session.Session_Logoff((get-hvglobalsession | select -first 1).id)

Damn locked, let’s force this bastard from his desktop.

$services1.Session.Session_LogoffForced((get-hvglobalsession | select -first 1).id)

Aaaand it’s gone

And to show that it works I had to make sure the first session wasn’t locked.

And now the big bang fuck all of you!

$services1.Session.Session_LogoffSessionsForced((Get-HVGlobalSession).id)

As you can see one of my users was a but slow in logging off (nested esxi with only a couple vcpu’s for that one) I have also created a script that asks for the user whom you want to logoff and which session you want to logoff in case they have multiple. It’s not the cleanest code that I have written but it works 🙂

$hvserver1=connect-hvserver servername -user user -domain domain -password passwords
$Services1= $hvServer1.ExtensionData

$username= Read-Host "Which user do you want to logoff? (no wildcards needed, part of the name is enough)"

$queryService = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$userdefn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$userdefn.queryEntityType = 'ADUserOrGroupSummaryView'
$userfilter1= New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterContains
$userfilter1.membername='base.name'
$userfilter1.value=$username
$userfilter2= New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterEquals
$userfilter2.membername='base.group'
$userfilter2.value=$False
$userfilter=new-object vmware.hv.QueryFilterAnd
[email protected]($userfilter1, $userfilter2)
$userdefn.filter=$userfilter
$users=($queryService.QueryService_Create($Services1, $userdefn)).results

$menu = @{}
for ($i=1;$i -le $users.count; $i++){ 
    Write-Host "$i. $($users[$i-1].base.name)" 
    $menu.Add($i,($users[$i-1].id))
}
[int]$ans = read-host "Please select the correct user"
$user=$menu.Item($ans)

$GlobalSessionQueryService = new-object VMware.Hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceService
$sessionfilterspec=new-object vmware.hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceQuerySpec
$sessionfilterspec.user=$user
$sessions=($GlobalSessionQueryService.GlobalSessionQueryService_QueryWithSpec($services1, $sessionfilterspec)).results

$menu = @{}
for ($i=1;$i -le $sessions.count; $i++){ 
    Write-Host "$i. $($sessions[$i-1].namesdata.basenames.MachineOrRDSServerName)" 
    $menu.Add($i,($sessions[$i-1].id))
}
[int]$ans = read-host "Please select the correct VDI Desktop"
$session=$menu.Item($ans)

$Services1.Session.Session_Logoffforced($session)
$queryService.QueryService_DeleteAll($services1)

This script forces the logoff for the sessions since I haven’t been able yet to find where the desktop status (locked or not) is visible.

[API’s] Getting session counts (incl performance comparison)

One of my customers asked the question if it is possible to get a quick sessioncount for a script that they can run very often for a correct logging of license usage. While this could easily be done by grabbing all the sessions I thought this could be a slow process. I remembered though that the first release of the vmware.hv.helper module had a function called get-podsessions that only returned a sessioncount. I decided to see what was used for this. By going back in time at github I found that the GlobalSessionQueryService was still used but with the GlobalSessionQueryService_GetCountWithSpec method. It needs the service and a spec of the type VMware.Hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceCountSpec.

the spec itself can hold one of the many options to get a count for

As you can see there is a globalentitlement property that needs to be set using the id so let’s grab that one first.

$queryService = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.queryEntityType = 'GlobalEntitlementSummaryView'
$globalentitlements = ($queryService.QueryService_Create($Services1, $defn)).results

I will use the first globalentitlement to grab the sessioncount

$globalentitlement=$globalentitlements | select -first 1
$globalsessionqueryservice_helper = New-Object VMware.Hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceService  
$count_spec = New-Object VMware.Hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceCountSpec  
$count_spec.globalentitlement=$globalentitlement.id
$sessioncountperglobalentitlements=$globalsessionqueryservice_helper.GlobalSessionQueryService_GetCountWithSpec($services1,$count_spec)

As you can see we actually get a count per pod so to get all the counts from all pods from all globalentitlements I have created a script with a couple foreach’s.

$hvserver1=connect-hvserver SERVERNAME
$services1=$hvserver1.extensiondata
$queryService = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.queryEntityType = 'GlobalEntitlementSummaryView'
$globalentitlements = ($queryService.QueryService_Create($Services1, $defn)).results
$queryservice.QueryService_DeleteAll($services1)
[email protected]()


foreach ($globalentitlement in $globalentitlements){
  $globalsessionqueryservice_helper = New-Object VMware.Hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceService  
  $count_spec = New-Object VMware.Hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceCountSpec  
  $count_spec.globalentitlement=$globalentitlement.id
  $sessioncountperglobalentitlements=$globalsessionqueryservice_helper.GlobalSessionQueryService_GetCountWithSpec($services1,$count_spec)
  foreach ($sessioncountperglobalentitlement in $sessioncountperglobalentitlements){
    $pod=$services1.pod.pod_get($sessioncountperglobalentitlement.id)
    $sessioncount+= New-Object PSObject -Property @{
      "Global_Entitlement_Name" = $globalentitlement.base.displayname;
      "Pod_Name"=$pod.displayname
      "Pod_Sessioncount" = ($sessioncountperglobalentitlement | select-object -expandproperty count);
      "Site_Name"= ($services1.site.site_get($pod.site)).base.Displayname;
    }
  }
}
 return $sessioncount | select-object Global_Entitlement_Name,Pod_Name,Site_Name,Pod_Sessioncount

The W10_MGMT global entitlement only has a pool in pod1 so even though the pod doesn’t have a pool inside the global entitlement it will still return a sessioncount.

Performance

I also decided to time it but in my small environment it took 3 seconds and 3 of those where for connecting to the connection server. If I removed the connecting part it was 0.7 seconds.

Measure-Command {D:\scripts\dev\session_count.ps1}

Back at the customer I decided to compare this against dumping all global sessions, this will give some better data since it has a couple more sessions in it (around 3500 at the moment of testing)

The script I used for getting all global sessions is the code that I used for the get-hvglobalsession in the vmware.hv.helper module

$query_service_helper = New-Object VMware.Hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceService
$query=new-object vmware.hv.GlobalSessionQueryServiceQuerySpec

$SessionList = @()
foreach ($pod in $services1.Pod.Pod_List()) {
  $query.pod=$pod.id
  $queryResults = $query_service_helper.GlobalSessionQueryService_QueryWithSpec($services1, $query)
  $GetNext = $false
  do {
    if ($GetNext) { $queryResults = $query_service_helper.GlobalSessionQueryService_GetNext($services1, $queryResults.id) }
    $SessionList += $queryResults.results
    $GetNext = $true
  } while ($queryResults.remainingCount -gt 0)
    $query_service_helper.GlobalSessionQueryService_Delete($services1, $queryresults.id)

}
return $sessionlist

Screenshots from the timing:

so the getcountwithspec method is about 2.5 seconds faster but the data in the globalsession is way more extensive and usable for all kinds of management overviews.

[API]Resetting Desktops

This is the first post in a series of shorts that I will be posting about various methods that you can use with the VMware Horizon API’s. This time it will be about resetting desktops. When looking at the API Explorer you’ll see that there are two ways do do this from the machine service.

So the first is for a single VDI desktop and the latter for multiple.

First we need to get a list of vm’s I will be using the machines in pod1pool02 as victims for this post.

$queryservice=new-object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn=New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.QueryEntityType="MachineNamesView"
$filter=new-object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterContains
$filter.MemberName='base.name'
$filter.Value="Pod1Pool2"
$defn.filter=$filter
$results=($queryservice.QueryService_Query($services1, $defn)).results

with this result:

From this we’ll make a variable with all of them and one with a single one

$singlevm=$results | select-object -first 1
$multiplevms=$results

Before I will reset the single VM I will show the state of all the vm’s.

($queryservice.QueryService_Query($services1, $defn)).results.base.basicstate

And now let’s reset the vm.

$services1.machine.machine_reset($singlevm.id)

Since this is an instant clone you’ll see provisioned and not reset. Now let’s reset the rest as well.

$services1.Machine.Machine_ResetMachines($multiplevms.id)

And this method will work for all managed vdi desktops full, linked or instant clones.

The VMware Labs flings monthly for April 2019

It has been a quiet month for me on the blogging side of things. I am slowly rebuilding my lab so that costs a lot of time that I can’t spend on blogging. This month two new flings have been released and no less than six have received an update. the new flings are MyVMware CLI and App Volumes Entitlement Sync. The ones to receive an update are App Volumes Toolbox, Workspace One UEM Workload Migration Tool, Cross vCenter Workload Migration Utility, Identity Manager Migration/Backup Tool, vSphere HTML5 Web Client,  and HCIBench.

New Releases

MyVMware CLI

The MyVMware CLI fling is an early preview of api’s to download your entitled software from http://my.vmware.com.

MyVMware CLI is a command line client used to login and interact with my.vmware.com.
It provides an interface for programmatic query and download of VMware product binaries.

This Fling is in early preview and allows you to find and download:

  • Every product
  • Every version
  • Every file

Note: Any download attempts will be restricted to the entitlements afforded by your my.vmware.com account.

App Volumes Entitlement Sync

If you have multiple App Volumes installations than the App Volumes Entitlement Sync fling can be usefull to make sure everyone has the same rights everywhere.

The App Volumes Entitlement Sync Fling will read, compare and sync entitlements from one App Volumes instance to another. This helps customers managing multiple App Volumes instances across one or multiple geographic sites.

Updated flings

App Volumes Toolbox

The App Volumes Toolbox fling makes it easier to manage your App Volumes setups.

Changelog

Version 2.0

  • Optimized for App Volumes 2.x
  • Remove support for Enzo and App Volumes 3
  • Bug Fixes

Workspace One UEM Workload Migration Tool

The Workspace One UEM Workload Migration Tool fling allows you to easily migrate applications and configurations between various WS One setups.

Changelog

Version 1.0.1

  • Fixed issue with expired credentials.

Cross vCenter Workload Migration Utility

The Cross vCenter Workload Migration Utility allows you to vmotion or move vm’s between linked and unlinked vCenter servers. Since this version it also supports NSX-T Opaque networking.

Changelog

Version 2.6, April 15, 2019

  • Added support for NSX-T Opaque Network (enables migration to/from VMC and on-premises vSphere with NSX-T)

Identity Manager Migration/Backup Tool

With the Identity Manager Migration/Backup Tool you can automate the process of migrating and backing up from one idm to another.

Changelog

Version 1.6

  • Exports categories to new XML file appname_categories.xml
  • Exports entitlements to a new XML file called appname_entitlements.xml
  • Imports categories
  • Creates the category if it doesn’t exist on tenant where importing
  • Shows if a bundle has an associated entitlement or category xml file
  • Shows number of applications returned
  • Shows number of categories an application has assigned to it
  • Windows reserved characters are replaced with an underscore for export bundle

Version 1.5

  • Allows more than 20 applications to be returned – now up to 500 applications will be returned by the tool
  • Added number of applications returned into the group box title

vSphere HTML5 Web Client

Want the newest even with vCenter 6.7? Use the vSphere HTML5 Web Client fling!

Changelog

Fling 4.2.0 – Build 13172979
New Features

  • vSphere Perspective Management available under Administration > Customization > Perspectives This new feature enables administrators to take control of which parts of the UI other administrators see. This is done by defining a set of views and combining them together into a so called “perspective”.
    • [Perspective tab] As an administrator you can show or hide: tabs, portlets and primary views.
    • [Assignments tab] Perspectives can be assigned to both users and groups.
    • Demo is available at https://www.dropbox.com/s/06z15xspsvrciys/Perspectives-demo-fling.mp4
  • Code Capture can also capture calls for operations made when managing Content Libraries.
  • Code Capture can generate scripts in additional languages: Python and vRO (vRealize Orchestrator) Javascript.

Known Issues

We noticed an intermittent issue with stopping the vsphere-client. You can always kill the process manually by running these commands

ps -ax | grep java
kill -9
ps -ax | node
kill -9

HCIBench

Want to test your Hyperconverged Infrastructure? HCIBench Is one of the tools you can use for that.

Changelog

Version 2.0

  • Added fio as an alternative workload generator
  • Added Grafana for workload live monitoring
  • Switched UI to clarity
  • Allow user to select one to four cases while using easy-run

Bug fixes

  • MD5 checksum of HCIBench_2.0.ova: ba3c2b06b8c27fb41a1bb68baedb325f

Applying Golden Images for VDI & RDS cloned pools using the Horizon View API’s

Recently I came up with the idea to create a script to apply new Golden Images against the various types of desktop pools and farms that we have in Horizon View. This was something that I thought was not available from the vmware.hv.helper module but after some research I did find that it it available from the module by using start-hvpool and start-hvfarm. No those are not the best names for the functions in my opinion. This wouldn’t stop me for creating this post though on how to apply the images using api’s only since the module uses mapentries and I still hate those. I will cover full clones and defining a new image without recomposing in a next post since that requires updating the pools.

Let’s take a look at the api explorer on what is needed to recompose or push an image.

 

The DesktopPushImageSpec for instant clones has a comparable setup with some nuance differences.

For RDS farms the linked clones spec is equal to the desktop spec but for instant clones there’s a rather big difference but I will cover that later on.

So the common steps for most types of applying the golden image are:

  • Selecting the Desktop Pool or RDS Farm
  • getting the id for the vcenter or datacenter where the parent VM lives
  • getting the id of the Parent VM
  • getting the id of the snapshot to use
  • getting the id’s of the machines in the desktop pool (Linked Clones only)
  • Select date & time for the recompose or imagepush (if required)
  • combine the above info into a spec to recompose or imagepush
  • Apply the recompose or ImagePush

Each step uses information from the step above it.

Selecting the Desktop Pool or RDS Farm

This can be done using queries. For desktops we user the desktopsummaryview definition and for farms farmsummaryview.

$poolname="pod02_LC"
$queryservice=New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn=new-object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.QueryEntityType='DesktopSummaryView'
$defn.Filter= New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterEquals -property @{'MemberName'='desktopSummaryData.name'; 'value'=$poolname}
$desktoppool=($queryservice.QueryService_Create($services1, $defn)).results

And for a farm

$farmname="rds_IC"
$queryservice=New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn=new-object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.QueryEntityType='FarmSummaryView'
$defn.Filter= New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterEquals -property @{'MemberName'='data.name'; 'value'=$farmname}
$farm=($queryservice.QueryService_Create($services1, $defn)).results

getting the id for the vcenter or datacenter where the parent VM lives

For desktops this is a property of the $desktoppool object we have now

$desktopppoolvcenterid=$desktoppool.desktopsummarydata.VirtualCenter

For automated farms we need a small extra step since it is not property for the summary data we we can get it by doing a farm_get with the id we received from the query

$farmvcenterid=($services1.Farm.Farm_Get($farm.id)).automatedfarmdata.VirtualCenter

getting the id of the Parent VM

Using the vcenterid as done below we are able to list all vm’s in the vCenter that might be a Golden Image using

$services1.BaseImageVm.BaseImageVm_List($desktopppoolvcenterid)

You might be able to see it but this gives a list of all VM’s in the vCenter, sadly there is no query for this yet even though that would be really useful. If you know the exact name you can select on that but if you look at the IncompatibleReasons property there’s info to filter (if you want to create a menu for example)

$baseimagevmlist=$services1.BaseImageVm.BaseImageVm_List($desktopppoolvcenterid)
$baseimagevmlist.IncompatibleReasons

InUseByDesktop is a usable one for instantclones. I don’t know why InUseByLinkedCloneDesktop doesn’t give any true values even though I have one pool with linked clones, viewcomposerreplica does work. I have filtered this on some of the more obvious ones and end up with both my golden images for Windows 7 & Server 2016

$baseimagevmlist |where {$_.IncompatibleReasons.InUseByDesktop -eq $false -and $_.IncompatibleReasons.InstantInternal -eq $false -and $_.IncompatibleReasons.ViewComposerReplica -eq $false}

I will do it easy and select on the name for now

$Desktopbaseimagevm=$baseimagevmlist | where {$_.name -eq "GI_H72"}
$farmbaseimagevm=$baseimagevmlist | where {$_.name -eq "rds_template"}

getting the id of the snapshot to use

With the baseimagevmid we can utilize the baseimagesnapshot method to get the id for the snapshot.

$desktopsnapshotlist=$services1.BaseImageSnapshot.BaseImageSnapshot_List($Desktopbaseimagevm.id)
$farmsnapshotlist=$services1.BaseImageSnapshot.BaseImageSnapshot_List($farmbaseimagevm.id)

In this there is also an IncompatibleReasons property but that doesn’t give a lot of information so we’ll need to filter on name.

$desktopLCsnapshot=$desktopsnapshotlist | where-object {$_.name -eq "gi_linked"}
$desktopICsnapshot=$desktopsnapshotlist | where-object {$_.name -eq "snap_gi"}
$farmsnapshot=$farmsnapshotlist | where-object {$_.name -eq "gi_rds_2016"}

getting the id’s of the machines in the desktop pool

As you’ll see later in the spec there’s a requirement to list the machine id’s for the pool if you want to do a recompose. These can be grabbed by doing a query

$queryService = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.queryEntityType = 'MachineSummaryView'
$defn.filter=New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterEquals -property @{'memberName'='base.desktop'; 'value'=$desktoppool.id}
$QueryResults=$queryService.Queryservice_create($Services1, $defn)
$desktopmachinelist=$queryresults.results

For Linked Clone RDS farms you ned to use the QueryEntityType of RDSServerSummaryView but since I don’t have those in my lab I can only show the theory

$queryService = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.queryEntityType = 'RDSServerSummaryView'
$defn.filter=New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterEquals -property @{'memberName'='base.desktop'; 'value'=$farm.id}
$QueryResults=$queryService.Queryservice_create($Services1, $defn)
$farmmachinelist=$queryresults.results

Settings date and time for the action

It’s not required to set a date and but is very usable if you want to schedule an action. Please be aware that this is based on us format for day and time so mm-dd-yyyy otherwise I would have scheduled it for august.

$datetime=[DateTime]"02-08-2019 10:00:00AM"

The [DateTime] converts the string that follows it to a variable of the type day and time

combine the above info into a spec to recompose or imagepush.

To build the spec we first need to declare a new object with new-object vmware.hv.DesktopRecomposeSpec please be aware that for this name you need to look at the data object in the API explorer and not the class.

$desktoprecomposespec=new-object vmware.hv.DesktopRecomposeSpec
$desktoprecomposespec.ParentVm=$desktopbaseimagevm.id
$desktoprecomposespec.Snapshot=$desktopLCsnapshot.id
$desktoprecomposespec.StartTime=$datetime
$desktoprecomposespec.LogoffSetting="WAIT_FOR_LOGOFF"
$desktoprecomposespec.StopOnFirstError=$true
$desktoprecomposespec.Machines=$desktopmachinelist.id

For the instant clone image push there’s an extra layer required for the settings

$desktopimagepushspec=new-object VMware.Hv.DesktopPushImageSpec
$desktopimagepushspec.settings=new-object vmware.hv.DesktopPushImageSettings
$desktopimagepushspec.ParentVm=$desktopbaseimagevm.id
$desktopimagepushspec.snapshot=$desktopICsnapshot.id
$desktopimagepushspec.settings.StartTime=$datetime
$desktopimagepushspec.settings.LogoffSetting="WAIT_FOR_LOGOFF"
$desktopimagepushspec.settings.StopOnFirstError=$true

The recompose for a linked clone rds farm is similar to the desktop linked clone.

$farmrecomposespec=new-object vmware.hv.farmRecomposeSpec
$farmrecomposespec.ParentVm=$farmbaseimagevm.id
$farmrecomposespec.Snapshot=$farmLCsnapshot.id
$farmrecomposespec.StartTime=$datetime
$farmrecomposespec.LogoffSetting="WAIT_FOR_LOGOFF"
$farmrecomposespec.StopOnFirstError=$true
$farmrecomposespec.Machines=$farmmachinelist.id

For RDS instant clone farms the pushing of a new image is part of the maintenance schedule that can be done immediate or recurring. I will do the recurring option for now since rds hosts needs to be refreshed every once in a while anyway. There’s some options inside the settings that are explained in the api explorer.

$farmmaintenancespec=new-object vmware.hv.FarmMaintenanceSpec
$farmmaintenancespec.recurringMaintenanceSettings=new-object vmware.hv.FarmRecurringMaintenanceSettings
$farmmaintenancespec.imageMaintenanceSettings=new-object vmware.hv.FarmImageMaintenanceSettings
$farmmaintenancespec.maintenanceMode="RECURRING"
$farmmaintenancespec.scheduledTime=$datetime
$farmmaintenancespec.logoffsetting="WAIT_FOR_LOGOFF"
$farmmaintenancespec.stopOnFirstError=$true
$farmmaintenancespec.recurringMaintenanceSettings.startTime="23:00"
$farmmaintenancespec.recurringMaintenanceSettings.maintenancePeriod="WEEKLY"
$farmmaintenancespec.recurringMaintenanceSettings.startInt=1
$farmmaintenancespec.ImageMaintenanceSettings.parentVm=$farmbaseimagevm.id
$farmmaintenancespec.ImageMaintenanceSettings.snapshot=$farmsnapshot.id

Apply the recompose or ImagePush

This is the easiest part of the spec’s have been build properly.

Please note that the variables for the pools I use are a bit different to show the linked and instant clone pools

$services1.Desktop.Desktop_Recompose($linkedclonepool.id,  $desktoprecomposespec)
$services1.Desktop.Desktop_SchedulePushImage($instantclonepool.id, $desktopimagepushspec)
$services1.farm.Farm_ScheduleMaintenance($farm.id, $farmmaintenancespec)

No visible feedback but it’s visible from the admin console (sadly not all tasks can be gotten from the api’s yet 🙁 )

That’s it for now but expect future posts about full clones, setting a default image for linked clones without recompose and maybe a complete script that does it all for you.

Added Checks to the vCheck for Horizon View

Starting this year I decided to really restart working on the vCheck for Horizon. I had several requests for RDS checks & Active directory plus I really wanted to get rid of everything related to the vmware.hv.helper module to make using it a little easier.

Just like the pools I pull the farms in the connection plugin so these can be used from other plugins.

# --- Get Desktop pools
$poolqueryservice=new-object vmware.hv.queryserviceservice
$pooldefn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$pooldefn.queryentitytype='DesktopSummaryView'
$poolqueryResults = $poolqueryService.QueryService_Create($Services1, $pooldefn)
$pools = foreach ($poolresult in $poolqueryResults.results){$services1.desktop.desktop_get($poolresult.id)}

# --- Get RDS Farms

$Farmqueryservice=new-object vmware.hv.queryserviceservice
$Farmdefn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$Farmdefn.queryentitytype='FarmSummaryView'
$FarmqueryResults = $FarmqueryService.QueryService_Create($Services1, $Farmdefn)
$farms = foreach ($farmresult in $farmqueryResults.results){$services1.farm.farm_get($farmresult.id)}

# ---- Remove queries
$services1.QueryService.QueryService_DeleteAll()

The deleteall() for the queries needs to be added to clean things up, otherwise you will run out of queries pdq. The RDS plugins I created are visible down below.

Also an AD check was added

The vCenter api call was split into three checks for vCenter itself, ESXi and datastores.

Besides these I have also added a saml check (tested by Aresh Sarkari, thank you!) and truesso checks (don’t have it in my lab so can’t test).

If you want an example of the vCheck that can be found HERE.

Setting maintenance mode for Linked Clones using API’s

If you have used the VMware.hv.helper the title of this blog post might sound strange since the set-hvmachine already has a way to set maintenance mode. When Ryan Butler asked me the question this week though I didn’t think of that and dived into the api’s immediately. The machines.Machine_EnterMaintenanceMode method looked good to me and than I though of the vmware.hv.helper and noticed that with

Set-HVMachine -Maintenance ENTER_MAINTENANCE_MODE

it was also possible so set maintenance mode. The usage though made me think immediately that this was not actually using a proper api call but the update function. A quick look at the function itself confirmed this. It sets that status of the virtual machine by directly setting the status.

if ($Maintenance) {
      if ($Maintenance -eq 'ENTER_MAINTENANCE_MODE') {
        $updates += Get-MapEntry -key 'managedMachineData.inMaintenanceMode' -value $true
      } else {
        $updates += Get-MapEntry -key 'managedMachineData.inMaintenanceMode' -value $false
      }
    }
(this is just a snippet of the complete function)

If you are below version 7.5 of Horizon view it’s probably of no use to continue with the rest of this blog post. The api explorer only mentions the relevant functions since 7.5! They have been tried against 7.0.3 and 6.2 and there they don’t work.

So back to the drawing board it was and I needed to look at the API explorer, there are 4 relevant methods for maintenance mode.

As usual there are methods for multiple machines that use an array of id’s (with machines in the name) and methods for single machines id’s (without the machines in the name).

Since I usually use instant clones these days I created a small pool with three linked clones. With get-hvmachine I can show you their names and state.

(get-hvmachine -pool pod2_linked).base | select-object name,basicstate

Since I know that get-hvmachine will already give you the id of a machine it’s easy to do a one liner to set one system in maintenance mode.

 $services1.Machine.Machine_EnterMaintenanceMode((get-hvmachine -machinename p2lc001).id)

and exit maintenance mode.

 $services1.Machine.Machine_ExitMaintenanceMode((get-hvmachine -machinename p2lc001).id)

And the entire pool?

$services1.Machine.Machine_EnterMaintenanceModemachines((get-hvmachine -pool pod2_linked).id)

And exit maintenance mode for the entire pool.

$services1.Machine.Machine_ExitMaintenanceModemachines((get-hvmachine -pool pod2_linked).id)

Okay so we now know how this works but I don’t want to use to vmware.hv.helper module for this at all because I want to be able to use a list of machines or based on part of the name. That can be done using a query. The query entitytype to use is MachineSummaryView and if you use queryfiltercontains it’s also possible to use only a part of the name for a kind of wildcard selection. Combine several of these in with queryfilteror and it gives the opportunity to select them from a list.

$connectionserver="servername"
$hvserver1=connect-hvserver $connectionserver 
$Services1= $hvServer1.ExtensionData
$machines=get-content machines.txt
$queryService = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.queryentitytype='MachineSummaryView'
[email protected]()
foreach ($machine in $machines) {
    $queryfiltercontains=New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFiltercontains -Property @{ 'memberName' = 'base.name'; 'value' = $machine }    
    $filterset+=$queryfiltercontains
    }
$orFilter = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterOr
$orFilter.filters = $filterSet
$defn.filter=$orFilter
$ids=($queryService.QueryService_Create($Services1, $defn)).results
$services1.Machine.Machine_EnterMaintenanceModeMachines($ids.id)
p2lc001
p2lc003

Now I replaced the names in the txt file with only p2lc00

$connectionserver="servername"
$hvserver1=connect-hvserver $connectionserver 
$Services1= $hvServer1.ExtensionData
$machines=get-content machines.txt
$queryService = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryServiceService
$defn = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryDefinition
$defn.queryentitytype='MachineSummaryView'
[email protected]()
foreach ($machine in $machines) {
    $queryfiltercontains=New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFiltercontains -Property @{ 'memberName' = 'base.name'; 'value' = $machine }    
    $filterset+=$queryfiltercontains
    }
$orFilter = New-Object VMware.Hv.QueryFilterOr
$orFilter.filters = $filterSet
$defn.filter=$orFilter
$ids=($queryService.QueryService_Create($Services1, $defn)).results
$services1.Machine.Machine_ExitMaintenanceModeMachines($ids.id)

And back into maintenance mode

So this is a nice way to manage the machines and their maintenance state. Please remember that these scripts only work against horizon 7.5 and higher.

Horizon View Api’s: back to basics part 3: Methods

Like I said in part two I wanted to do that first before going to method’s since for some methods you actually need the output from a query. I posted an example of that in the meanwhile with my post about sending messages to users. The get-hvglobalsession and get-hvlocalsession are based on queries that are used for the Session_SendMessages method of the session service.

The obvious way of finding available methods is by looking into the API Explorer.

It’s a complete list but it’s hard to find all the methods that belong to a service. It’s easier to do a get-method on a service.

$services1.connectionserverhealth | gm

So, in here we have two methods: ConnectionServerHealth_Get and ConnectionServerHealth_List. Even my wide PowerShell window is not big enough to show what’s needed to with the ConnectionServerHealth_Get method. For that we can use service.method without any brackets.

$services1.ConnectionServerHealth.ConnectionServerHealth_Get

and

$services1.ConnectionServerHealth.ConnectionServerHealth_List

The required input for the method’s is visible between the brackets. The _Get method requires an id of the type vmware.hv.connectionserverid and the list doesn’t even need an input. I will keep the first one to use for later while I run the latter one.

$services1.ConnectionServerHealth.ConnectionServerHealth_List()

A lot of these lists have information that is available on a deeper level, with a get-method everything is shown.

$services1.ConnectionServerHealth.ConnectionServerHealth_List() | gm

The ones where you see a property that has a definition that starts with vmware.hv…. has more content hidden. It is possible to access these by putting the entire line between brackets followed by .membername for example

($services1.ConnectionServerHealth.ConnectionServerHealth_List()).certificatehealth

Please be aware that this can go multiple levels deep for some methods. To avoid unneeded api calls it’s wise to declare a variable from the method and use that to access the data.

$connectionserverhealth=$services1.ConnectionServerHealth.ConnectionServerHealth_List()
$connectionserverhealth.certificatehealth

Now to show the use of the _get method I could use the id that I received from the _list method but that would be cheating. What I will do is put a list of all connectionservers into an array (even though I only have 1) and do a foreach with the _get method.

$connectionservers=$services1.ConnectionServer.ConnectionServer_List()
foreach ($connectionserver in $connectionservers){$services1.ConnectionServerHealth.ConnectionServerHealth_get($connectionserver.id)}

This is the basic usage for method’s. For some method’s a spec is required for input please take a look at this post about adding an instantclone administrator for an example. I will show some more details about that one in here. Let’s take a look at what the method requires as input.

$services1.InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministrator.InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministrator_Create

You can see that a spec is required of the type VMware.Hv.InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorSpec. The API Explorer will show that this actually is a bit weird one since it one contains a base.

If you click on the base you’ll see whats required in there.

These levels actually show that we need to declare multiple objects to build the actual spec. You can create the basic object with new-object objecttype

$InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorSpec=new-object vmware.hv.InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorSpec
$InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorSpec
$InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorSpec.base

As you see the base is empty and doesn’t know what data it can contain. This shows that we need to declare the object for every level where we need to enter some information.

First I tried this using the class that’s shown in the API explorer, this obviously didn’t work so I use the data object name.

$InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorSpec.base=new-object vmware.hv.InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorBase
$InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorSpec.base

In the link I posted above you should be able to find what’s required to create an actual instantcloneadministrator. With this I have covered most of the method’s and how they work. Please don’t assume that _list nevers needs an id or that _get always needs one because that’s not true. Sometimes it will also say ids like with my previous post about sending messages that means it needs an array of id’s most possibly generated by a query or an _list method.