[Update 15-10] VMware PowerCLI 11.0.0 release with new Horizon (7.6!) API calls

UPDATE 12-10: The new API explorer page also has been published, it just needs to be added to the main page. Check this link: https://code.vmware.com/apis/445

Update 15-10: I have received an overview from VMware about the other changes:

New API Endpoints:
ConnectionServer_GetTags
GlobalSettings_GetEnvironmentSettings
QueryService_DeleteByIds
Datastore_GetDatastoreRequirements
Datastore_ListDatastoresByDesktopOrFarm
RemoteApplication_EndApplication

There also have been some changes to some objects (MachineBase,AccessGroup etc) to include more properties

Original Article:

Today the latest version of PowerCLI was released with version 11.0.0. When you look at the release notes it’s obvious that some extra things have been added for the Horizon VIew API’s.

PowerCLI has been moving at quite the rapid pace over the last 2 years. In 2018, we’ve been releasing roughly every other month to make sure we get the latest features, performance improvements, and updates available as quickly as possible. Well, it’s been two months and we’re not going to break this trend. Today, we are releasing PowerCLI 11.0.0!

PowerCLI 11.0.0 comes with the following updates:

  • Added a new Security module
  • Added new cmdlets for Host Profiles
  • Added a new cmdlet to interact with NSX-T in VMware Cloud on AWS
  • Support for vSphere 6.7 Update 1
  • Support for NSX-T 2.3
  • Support for Horizon View 7.6
  • Support for vCloud Director 9.5
  • Multiplatform support for the Cloud module
  • Updated the Get-ErrorReport cmdlet
  • Removed the PCloud module
  • Removed the HA module

Even though Jake Robinson already gave me a heads up that this version was coming it’s always the question what has been added for Horizon View. According to the API explorer page no new querydefinitions have been added. Like last time I decided to compare the services against the old list and there are two new additions:

  • CategoryFolder
  • ResourceSettings

I have tried both against a Horizon 7.5 setup and they failed so these are only exposed from Horizon View 7.6 and up.

The first one called Categoryfolder is linked to the possibility to put rdsh applications into folders.

It currently has only one function:

I have also investigated if there was a way to change things using the helper function but sadly it has no .update api call so that’s a no-go. I currently have no rdsh on my lab so I can do the list but it doesn’t show anything.

The other new service is the .ResourceSettings just like categoryfolder it also only has one function:

For this one I can actually show what it’s used for:

It shows the general settings for forced logoffs.

Sadly this service also doesn’t show a way to change things.

Sadly I have no found no way yet to see what queryservice entity’s have been added so hopefully we will have a new API explorer soon (maybe with release notes this time, pretty please VMware?) that shows us all the new goods.

Horizon View Api’s: back to basics part 1: Connecting

Intro

I have done a lot of deep dives but just like the VMware{Code} session I did at VMworld I think it’s time to go back to the basics on how to work with the Horizon api’s from PowerCLI. First up is connecting to a Connection server and disconnecting. I will be showing various ways to do but the new and secure one is the best for me since that’s also usable when you want to schedule scripts.

The easy way

The easiest wat to connect is by using the connect-hvserver SERVERNAME

This will give you a nice credentials popup.

The Unsecure way

The previous way that I used was by using the -user, -pass and maybe the -domain parameters.

The ‘new’ and secure way

Since one of the latest updates it is also possible to use a credential object. We found this out during the Hackathon @VMworld US that it is possible. It will use the good old credentials function from Powershell like in this post from 2008. First you’ll need to make a file with the encrypted password. Big thanks to Ariel & Edgar 🙂 check this for the vDocumentation script.

The next two lines I will combine into one, just because I can.

Doing it in two lines is also possible and might make it a bit easier to read

And then it’s time to connect

That’s easy right?

Connect to the api’s

There’s a little bit more to it so you can actually use the api’s. First we need to put the session into a variable. I always use a number so it’s easy to separate my various pods.

Next up is actually making the services visible. Again I added the number for when I am working with multiple pod’s.

And a quick look at the available services which I will explain in a next blog post.

Disconnecting

If you are connected to a single Connection server this is easy, just a disconnect-hvserver is enough.

Or without confirmation, this is a standard powershell thing.

This will not work when you are connected to multiple Pod’s so you’ll need to specify the server you are connected to.

The End

Next time I will go into some of the things you can do with the services I quickly showed you.

New View API query services in PowerCLI 10.1.1: pulling event information without the sql password.

A while back I already posted about new services that where available for the View API’s in PowerCLI 10.1.1. Recently the api explorer for this version was published and can be found here. Two things that I didn’t find back then was the addition of two services for the query service. The first is GlobalApplicationEntitlementInfo this one can be compared to the previously already available GlobalEntitlementSummaryView and will return information about global entitlements.

The second added services is extremely useful: you can now query the event database. This means you don’t need the actual sql password anymore to query the events. According to the api explorer at least Horizon 7.3 is required and only events from the Event and Event_Data database tables. A simple query will show all events.

As you can see the data is divided in data and namesdata properties, these contain the same data as what is returned with get-hvevent. I added some selections to show only one event.

and

Offcourse it;s better to use filtering from the query directly. The full lust for that is available from the api explorer but I will give a couple of examples. (be aware that membername and the value are case sensitive)

Or by severity

As said it can be filtered on other properties as well but that might require some more logic to get the userid or desktopid for example. This is a very useful addition in my opinion to the Horizon View api’s.

New Horizon API calls in PowerCLI 10.1.1

VMware quietly released a new version of PowerCLI last week: 10.1.1. This release is mainly an update for the Horizon View API’s. This to bring it back on level with the current Horizon release at 7.5. The release notes are not very extensive but it has a fix for some people getting time-outs when connecting to a Connection server  plus a bunch of new api calls.

I have dumped the output from the available api calls into two text files and made a comparison:

Since there’s no update yet in the API explorer I will have to make an educated guess on what the functions do:

DesktopTask

When looking at the available method’s for this call it looks like it has everything to do with Desktop task. But it also can’t do a damn thing without an vmware.hv.desktoptaskid. This will most probably bu retrievable using a query. This is something I will further investigate in the future.

DiagOperation

To be honest I have no idea yet what this one does. I have tried created a VMware.Hv.DiagOperationRequest and tried to send it but got an error that no message queue handler was found. This might be something from Horizon 7.5 since I haven’t updated my lab yet.

GatewayAccessUserOrGroup

This one is easy, it creates, deletes, gets and lists remote access users. You can expect a function for this in the near future since it looks easy to build.

JwtToken

According to my sources this is a SSO token between the flex and html5 clients.

LogonTiming

This obviously is created to pull logon timing as the name suggests. I have put a session ID in a variable but sadly the data is not usable from PowerCLI. WHat it seems to be is the api call the Helpdesk client uses to pull the logon time. I didn’t have the timing profiler turned on initially and neither the helpdesk tool or this call gave my any information. Disconnected sessions also don’t give any information and when reconnected it gives the reconnection time not the initial logontime for when the session started. This is the same behaviour as the helpdesk tool.

Apparently the output is in a json format and for now I doubt if it will be usable in a function.

While the session itself has this information.

NetworkProxyConfiguration

No idea yet why there is a networkproxy configuration in here.

Performance

This gets some performance data using a session id as also visible in the helpdesk tool.

RemoteApplication

Gives per session information on the Skype 4 Business pairing mode.

RemoteAssistantTicket

100% sure related to the remote assistance function in the helpdesk tool.

RemoteProcess

Looks like this one gets some information from a query and then kills the process, will have to dig into it some further later on. This for sure is a function in the helpdesk tool.

ViewClient

Again from the helpdesktool, this gives the client version of a session.

Conclusion

For now I only see the DesktopTask and GatewayAccessUserOrGroup ending up in a function in the vmware.hv.helper. The first one will need some digging on how it exactly works but it has the looks of a usable call. The latter on can be in there pretty fast if I find the time to do so. The other ones

 

Update

Already received some extra information about some calls.

New experimental functions for the vmware.hv.helper on github

While working on my presentation for the 2nd vEUCtechcon event in Utrecht (The Netherlands) on may 28th I have added a list of new functions to the vmware.hv.helper module. While I haven’t had the time yet to clean them up to be proper coded scripts I have decided to already publish them on Github. All of them work but might be missing a feature or two and almost all of them are get-hv* or new-hv* type functions. Since the presentation is all about building an environment I have decided to build the remove parts later on. You might have already seen some screenshots on twitter recently:

Added functions that are not in the official module yet:

  • register-hvvirtualcenter
  • set-hveventdatabase
  • set-hvlicense
  • get-hvlicense
  • new-hvinstantcloneadministrator
  • New-HVRole
  • Get-HVRole
  • Get-HVpermission
  • New-HVPermission
  • Get-HVVirtualcenter
  • Get-HVInstantCloneAdministrator
  • Get-HVPod
  • Set-HVPod
  • Get-HVHomeSite
  • New-HVHomeSite

 

Registering an Instantclone administrator using PowerCLI

Another question Sean Massey asked me if it is possible to register an instant clone domain administrator. This is possible using the instantcloneenginedomainadministrator service with the InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministrator_create method. This needs a spec with the following content:

  • spec (vmware.hv.InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorSpec)
    • base (vmware.hv.InstantCloneEngineDomainAdministratorBase)
      • username (string)
      • domain (domainid)
      • password(vmware.hv.securestring)

The password can be created using the same scriptlet I used to register a new vCenter server. The domain ID can actually be gotten by listing all domains using

For now I have created a scripts that requires you to give some details so it can register the instant clone domain administrator. It can also be found on Github but I will also definitively add it to the vmware.hv.helper module.

Pulling horizon session information using PowerCLI

I should’ve already posted a blog about this but better late then never. At the end of february I posted about several new functions being added to the vmware.hv.helper and two out of three where about pulling session information. Recently I received some questions about using those since it’s the raw data being returned. For my Dutch vmug presentation I used several gif’s that showed what you can do with that data. I might need to update the cmdlets so all information will be shown at once but that’s for another time since it might slow down the cmdlet a lot and I don’t like that.

Usage

Since get-hvglobalsession and get-hvlocalsession show almost similar data I will only show the latter one.

As you see this only shows the methods contained inside the session. We can show the content by pipelining it to  select-object -expandproperty but I prefer the bracket method since these might go several layers deep.

Some of the returned values are logical like the username, machineorrdsservername. The desktop name though is the actual desktop pool the user is connected to. Desktoptype can be Automated, Manual or RDS depending on the type of desktop and Desktopsource can be Virtual_Center (VM’s hosted on vCenter but not managed by Horizon or Full Clone desktops), View_Composer(when using Linked Clones), Instant_Clone_engine (when using Instant Clones), Unmanaged (physical machines, non-vCenter vm’s) or RDS (Terminal Servers). Farmname will be used when it’s an RDS session. The Securitygateway will show the Connection Server the user connected to or the UAG/Security server used.

the same can be done with referencedata and sessiondata

Not a lot of directly usefull information but a bunch of id’s that you might be able to use with the api’s if needed.

A lot of information about the session itself.

The actual code

The get-hvglobalsession actually is a query repeated for all pods. First it connects to the query service and then creates a query to run against each pod and add that to a sessionlist.

The get-hvlocalsession is almost the same, it just doesn’t need to foreach since it doesn’t have multiple pods to query.

In both there is a do while because otherwise it will run into some restrictions about maximum amount of data to return.

Adding vCenter server to Horizon View using the api’s

Yesterday Sean Massey (https://thevirtualhorizon.com/) asked me if it was possible to add a vCenter server + some other things to Horizon View using the api’s. With a quick look at the api explorer I confirmed this should be possible. The other things he asked I will put in a separate blogpost.

It looks like a simple matter of building the spec and I should be good. In the end it turned out to be a bit more work then expected. Some items are not required according to the api explorer but should at least be called in the spec (set them to something empty) while others can safely be left away. The automatic generated ssl certs in my lab also turned out to be a pita. First I copied them from a current spec and later I downloaded the certificate on the Connection server itself and read that cert. Andrew Morgan (http://andrewmorgan.ie/)from VMware helped me out with this by showing their internal script that they use. It turned out that except for the SSL certs I was on the right path. As usual I will add this functionality to the vmware.hv.helper but since that might take a while I decided to create a useful script

Looking at the output it will only ask for the vCenter user’s password and if a Composer server is set for that user’s password.

 

Added functions in vmware.hv.helper

Last Saturday I created a pull request to add some new functionality to the VMware.hv.helper. Together with an older PR that was still open it received an okay on Sunday. This is a list of the functionality I have added:

  • Get-HVHealth
    • Shows the health information for the following services:
      • ADDomain
      • CertificateSSOConnector
      • ConnectionServer,EventDatabase
      • SAMLAuthenticator
      • SecurityServer
      • ViewComposer
      • VirtualCenter
      • Pod
  • new-hvpodfederation
    • Initiates the Cloud Pod Architecture.
  • remove-hvpodfederation
    • Uninitiates the Cloud Pod Architecture.
  • get-hvpodfederation
    • Shows information about the Cloud Pod Architecture.
  • register-hvpod
    • Registers a new pod in the Cloud Pod Architecture.
  • unregister-hvpod
    • Removes a pod from the Cloud Pod Architecture. This can either be gracefully or forced.
  • set-hvpodfederation
    • Sets the name of the Cloud Pod Architecture.
  • get-hvsite
    • Retrieves information about all sites in the Cloud Pod Architecture.
  • new-hvsite
    • Creates a new site in the Cloud Pod Architecture.
  • set-hvsite
    • Sets site properties within the Cloud Pod Architecture.
  • remove-hvsite
    • Removes a site from the Cloud Pod Architecture.

The next functionality on my list is to put the pod service methods from this previous post into functions.

Managing Pods in a Horizon View Cloud Pod Environment using PowerCLI & Api’s

After Pod Federations and Sites it is time to manage the actual pods. Let’s take a look at what we can do.

Looks like a short post to me since there’s onl Get, List and Update

Pod_Get

Just like with site’s the get can be used in conjunction with a podid that might be gotten from somewhere else

This selects the first podid listed when pulling all the pods from all sites and gets the information about that pod. We’ll see the same information when doing a list but just with all pod’s listed.

Pod_List

Those endpoints are the connection servers in the pod. Let’s take a short detour and get the listing for one of those (the podendpoint service only has list and get so you will not see them separately anyway).

It might look lazy to use the select -first one and yes it is a bit but doing  a foreach to explain things also doesn’t really work in my opinion.

Pod_Update

Standard by now, first we need to connect to the podservice.

Under $podhelper we can already see how to set things.

Let’s update  the easy things.

As a result we have updated the name and description of the pod. The other thing we can do is assign the pod to another site. Thankfully I already have two of those created.

Both the lists aren’t required but I added them to show that the pods are spread over both pods now.